Close

Selected Writing

"To “scale” is to produce a caricature: elevating similar characteristics found among many, while reducing the distinctions of personality that make us who we are. It removes the variation, pluralism, contradiction, inevitable nuance, the elements that create an individual identity." The Opacity of Scale: How Numbers Blind us to Meaning, Observer, April 2017

"To “scale” is to produce a caricature: elevating similar characteristics found among many, while reducing the distinctions of personality that make us who we are. It removes the variation, pluralism, contradiction, inevitable nuance, the elements that create an individual identity."
The Opacity of Scale: How Numbers Blind us to Meaning, Observer, April 2017


"Our imaginations are born from our pasts, our presents, our hopes, our desires, our heartbreaks — creating a unique vantage point. Each of us brings this landscape of our lives to how we see and perceive the world. We each see through the lens of the most significant frame: our own identity. To ignore this is to ignore the reality of being human." Between Image and Reality, December 2016

"Our imaginations are born from our pasts, our presents, our hopes, our desires, our heartbreaks — creating a unique vantage point. Each of us brings this landscape of our lives to how we see and perceive the world. We each see through the lens of the most significant frame: our own identity. To ignore this is to ignore the reality of being human."
Between Image and Reality, December 2016


"Imagine if the words sunglasses, thunder, continent, and sorrow were suddenly replaced with a single, brand-new word that meant each of those things, depending on their context. How would writers respond? How would readers know which meaning you were seeking when the new word was used? This is what is happening to designers." Digitization and the Loss of Iconography, September 2016

"Imagine if the words sunglasses, thunder, continent, and sorrow were suddenly replaced with a single, brand-new word that meant each of those things, depending on their context. How would writers respond? How would readers know which meaning you were seeking when the new word was used? This is what is happening to designers."
Digitization and the Loss of Iconography, September 2016